Essay on Management

1972 Words 8 Pages
Management

It is almost always a team of people doing a task is better off than a person doing it. And if the leader is a narrow-minded, tyrant that has the stubbornness of a 5-year old child and the temper of a grumpy old person constantly on the verge of explosion, it is sure that the autonomy of the company will by out of sync. It was 2 years ago that a CEO had almost single-handedly almost brought a company to its knees, sending shock throughout all corners of Wall Street. He went by the name of “Chainsaw Al.” The near crumble of Sunbeam Corporation, a company that specializes in making household and outdoor goods, laid basically in the personality of Al Dunlap and his style of management, where he was autocratic and the
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Al Dunlap had the expert power, the know-how of turning a company around since he had saved companies in the past from nearly going into flames such as American Can, Lily Tulip, Crown Zellerbach, and Scott. The last form of power that he withholds is coercive power, which is the ability of a leader to obtain compliance through fear of punishment. Throughout the drama at Sunbeam, this kind of power was the most evident and influential in relation to all the disorder that happened. In Dunlap’s presence, knees were known to tremble and stomachs to churn. Executives say that he would throw papers or furniture, bang his hands on his desk, and shout so ferociously that a manager’s hair would be blown back by the stream of air that rushed from Dunlap’s mouth (Byrne 138). Everyone was so afraid of him, that no one dared to challenge his decisions, even when they became unethical and illegal by standards of any company’s corporate culture. In any company, it is important that information flows from bottom to top and top to bottom to bring out the best transparency in the conditions of the company. People were so intimidated that when confronting him, suggestions for improvement were left at the front door of his office. “In a meeting with Al, you are not there to tell him anything. You are there to listen. If you didn’t hit your numbers, he would tear all over you,” said William Kirkpatrick, an operating manager who worked with Dunlap at

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