Essay on Toshiba Production Case

1951 Words Sep 9th, 2012 8 Pages
Designing Toshiba’s Notebook Computer Line
A Study of Manufacturing Capacity

12/12/2011
MGT 393-03

Introduction
We analyzed a Toshiba assembly line plan for a new subnotebook computer. The engineering section manager, Toshihiro Nakamura, wants to make changes to the line process as designed by the engineers. The basic assembly line equipment and space already exist within the Toshiba plant, so the subnotebook assembly process must conform to those preexisting constraints. Specifically, the assembly line is a straight 14.4-meter conveyor system that can accommodate 8 to 12 workers plus one supporter to aid in the assembly process. The employees work at assembling for 7.5 hours a day. The computers are assembled from
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We used certain additional formulas to achieve the results that were not required but increased our understanding of the situation as we more extensively analyzed the efficiencies of the assembly line.
We started by analyzing what the case study was asking of us. The goal of the case that presented a problem was to be able to produce 300 computers in a day with a 7.5-hour workday. This means that we needed to produce at least 40 computers an hour, which, according to our bottleneck theory, meant that every 90 seconds we needed to complete the production of a computer. Therefore, we had to establish a bottleneck time of 90 seconds or less for all of the given operations otherwise we would not be able to accomplish the 300 computers that we needed to complete.
Based on the information we gathered and on the assumptions that are outlined below, we are able to reach our goal. In the case that these assumptions are either impossible or not applicable, we would need to resort to working overtime or adding an additional assembly line for the subnotebook. Either of these two options can easily achieve the goal of 300 computers per day, but Toshihiro did not want to use overtime and we have assumed only one line is to be used.
The assumptions we used are an important part of the case; they were either given directly in

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