The Bardic Tradition and How It Affects the Content and Nature of Contemporary Arts Practices

1762 Words Dec 25th, 2011 8 Pages
AMAN 1010 Perspectives in the Arts Amy Wright P11248462
Tutor: Maurice Maguire

Select some examples of work and explain how the Bardic Tradition affects the content and nature of contemporary arts practices

Word Count: 1563

AMAN 1010 Perspectives in the Arts Amy Wright P11248462
Seminar Tutor: Maurice Maguire

Select some examples of work and explain how the Bardic Tradition affects the content and nature of contemporary arts practices

This essay considers how the Bardic Tradition affects the content and nature of contemporary arts. This will be carried out by selecting some examples of work and describing in more detail the process and influence of the Bardic Tradition on contemporary arts practices and how this is
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In general stories evolve and change; people hear the story differently and take different interpretations and influences from them. “The Brothers Grimm” are a prime example of story telling being passed on from generation to generation. The brothers Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm’s collection of Nursery Rhymes and household tales have gradually been revised throughout the last two hundred years, from their first ideas being written down and published as a slim version of a book and appearing in German book stores in 1812. A few years later, during the 1800’s the book “Nursery and Household Tales” was then translated into several other languages the first ones of which were Danish, Dutch and English. The stories and rhymes through being repeated have now evolved into the form of which they are known today and more than often form the basis of plays, dance productions and pantomime.

Amy Wright P11248462

The idea of their tales originated from: “… the autumn of 1805 Von Armin and Brentano had published the first volume of their collection of folk songs…” “…in a post script Armin had appealed for tales as they were still current among the common people. The Grimm’s were sympathetic. They had become keener and keener on their country’s oral tradition, and about 1806 they began writing down popular tales, realising that this “buried gold” was in danger of being lost,

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