Multinational Corporations Essay

3799 Words May 18th, 2013 16 Pages
Multinational corporations

Table of contents Preface 4 1. Introduction; General meaning of MNC 4 2. Ranking multinationals 5 3. Entry of Multinational corporation into new markets, 6 4. Three Stages of Evolution 7 5. Motives for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) 9 6. The comparison of MNC and TNC 11 7. What are the benefits and problems that MNCs face? 11 8. What are the Russian companies that achieve the multinational status? 13 Conclusion 14 Bibliography 14 Appendix 15

Preface
We would like to consider the most interesting topic concerning the multinational corporations. If we called it like that, it means that company made a great success in the market, it operate in several foreign countries. In this
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It is not always obvious that a firm is a multinational. The growth in alliances, joint ventures and mergers and acquisitions means that consumers tend to recognize the brand, rather than know who the parent company is. Who, for example, now owns Jaguar or Land Rover? The answer in this case is Ford.
Nearly all major multinationals are either: American, Japanese or Western European, such as Nike, Coca-Cola, Wal-Mart, AOL, Toshiba, Honda and BMW. Advocates of multinationals say they create jobs and wealth and improve technology in countries that are in need of such development. On the other hand, critics say multinationals can have undue political influence over governments, can exploit developing nations as well as create job losses in their own home countries.
1.1 History
Multinational corporations have existed since the beginning of overseas trade. They have remained a part of the business scene throughout history, entering their modern form in the 17th and 18th centuries with the creation of large, European-based monopolistic concerns such as the British East India Company during the age of colonization. Multinational concerns were viewed at that time as agents of civilization and played a pivotal role in the commercial and industrial development of Asia, South America, and Africa. By the end of the 19th century, advances in communications had more closely linked world markets, and multinational

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